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516.3 Lesson plan or project (20%, 20 points)

The third project in ENGL516 asks you to develop an assignment or assignment sequence that is integrated with a digital writing platform (e.g., wikis, blogs, Twitter, Flickr, Delicious/Diigo, etc.). The project is designed for you to focus your learning in ENGL516 on some combination of a pedagogical application and a theoretical framework for teaching. You are free to develop the assignment for a specific audience you are already working with, or you can put together an assignment or sequence for a unit you would like to teach one day.

The assignment or assignment sequence should include the following pieces:

1) an overview/background statement that develops the theoretical/pedagogical framework (i.e., the occasion and rationale for the assignment/sequence);
2) an explanation to students (e.g., an assignment prompt);
3) a breakdown of the assignment or sequence into a schedule or timetable;
4) an analytical examination of the assignment/sequence in terms of the four tiers of literacy (functional, critical, rhetorical, and networked);
5) either an abbreviated annotated bibliography or an actual example of the assignment.

Supplemental pieces may include shorter assignments, resources, and guidelines you find useful to include. The overall length of the project will be approximately 15-20 pages, although this is a project that may incorporate online materials. In such cases, we should talk about developing this work to an appropriate scope. Also, even though the items are listed in specific order, you are welcome to develop P3 in whatever order you want.

P3. Ignite Presentation (10%, 10 points)
Project Three culminates with a presentation you will deliver to the class. Your presentation will introduce your work and share the most salient qualities of the assignment/sequence. Presentations will accompany a Powerpoint slideshow consisting of twenty slides each set to rotate automatically after 15 seconds. Individual slides may not include more than eight words. Slides should include carefully selected, carefully sized images (i.e., these are visually intensive presentations, not text heavy slide-documents). As you present, you may use up to five index cards; however, you are strongly encouraged to present extemporaneously, working informally from memory rather than reading from a script. Watch a few Ignite presentations at the O'Reilly site or Ignite Ann Arbor.

Other Resources
As you begin thinking about options, you should look carefully at the assignments in Writing New Media. You can also look more closely at new media writing assignments I have created and adapted by visiting selected courses listed on this teaching page. If you have specific interests in developing an assignment/sequence related to questions or topics (e.g., copyright law, comics, Twitter, photography, podcasting), feel free to consult with me about possible approaches.

Drafts, In-progress Feedback and Deadlines
Develop a one-paragraph proposal (not more than 200 words) and submit it in Google Docs no later than Tuesday, March 8. You may seek feedback on P3 at any stage of the process simply by emailing a request to me or stopping in during office hours. If you email, I will, in most cases, respond with suggestions and questions within two days. A full draft of your project is due on Tuesday, March 29. Ignite slide decks are due no later than Sunday, April 10; you should be prepared to give your presentation on Tuesday, April 12. Completed projects are due on Friday, April 15.

Title
Develop an unforgettable title for your project.

Submission Guidelines
The project you produce should be gathered into a single document, either a .doc file, or a simple web page you create. The file will contain the following:

  1. Identifying information (name, date, course, and professor's name)
  2. Project title (unforgettable!)
  3. an overview/background statement that develops the theoretical/pedagogical framework (i.e., the occasion and rationale for the assignment/sequence);
  4. an explanation to students (e.g., an assignment prompt);
  5. a breakdown of the assignment or sequence into a schedule or timetable;
  6. an analytical examination of the assignment/sequence in terms of the four tiers of literacy (functional, critical, rhetorical, and networked);
  7. either an abbreviated annotated bibliography or an actual example of the assignment.

If a specific section is available online rather than on paper, include in the Google Doc a section heading and a link to the place where it exists online.

Evaluation Criteria

P3 is valued at 20 points (20% of your overall grade in the course). An additional 10 points (10%) are assigned to the presentation.

The assignment/sequence portion of Project Three will be evaluated according to the following five criteria:

  1. Theoretical/pedagogical rationale
  2. Audience-aware and detailed explanation of assignment
  3. Development (the project is complete, fully developed; all aspects, including required length and an unforgettable title, are available)
  4. Specificity of tiered literacies analysis
  5. Accuracy (concerning mistakes or errors)

The presentation will be evaluated according to the following three criteria:

  1. Delivery: (eye contact, engagement with audience, presence, command of material, timing)
  2. Slideshow: (auto-rotation, image-intensivity, technical precision)
  3. Explanation of process, assignment, and pedagogical framework: (compelling content, appropriate scope for five minutes, insight into computers and writing)

Each criterion listed above will be evaluated on the following scale:

<NA----------NI----------AC----------EX>

EX: Exceptional. The writer has applied the criterion with distinction.
AC: Acceptable/meets expectations. The writer has applied the criterion to a satisfactory degree.
NI: Needs improvement. The writer has minimally applied the criterion in the project.
NA: Not applied. The writer has not applied the criterion in the project.

Contact Information

Derek N. Mueller, PhD
Associate Professor of Rhetoric and Writing
Director of Composition
Department of English
Virginia Tech
Office: 315 Shanks Hall
Spring 2019 Office Hours: T, 12-3
Phone: +1-734-985-0485
dmueller@vt.edu
http://derekmueller.net/rc/

"In a digital universe, word, sound, and image share a common notation. They are, at a fundamental level, convertible into one another" (465). Richard Lanham, "Implications of Electronic Information"

"These days all technology follows computer technology" (159). Kevin Kelly, What Technology Wants

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